PROFILE

Casey Golden

CEO, Luxlock

Casey Golden is the CEO and Co-Founder of Luxlock, a Retail Experience Platform pioneering the experience economy through regenerative connected technology. One of the early fashion bloggers and former founder of a style subscription startup, she has created some of the earliest technologies in mass personalization. Casey has dedicated her 15 year career to moving the business of fashion forward through multi-point retention initiatives and supply chain optimization. With the rise of extractive technology, and mass retail solutions focused on the buy/sell cycle, Casey has been an advocate for a more humanized approach building retail technology that shares the value system and natural consumer behaviors seen mostly in the luxury industry.

Luxlock is merging online/in-store shopping experiences and linking brand extensions with local activities to create an exclusive experience marketing channel. As more brands, specifically luxury brands diversify their offerings with more lifestyle experiences like vineyards, restaurant’s, and hotels, Luxlock is the software connecting and deploying personal experiences on-demand. She’s led distribution and digitization strategies for companies like Ralph Lauren, VF Corporation, and Exenta; you’ve likely shopped on a ecommerce store she’s developed.

Disappointed by the sales and implementation timelines of enterprise retail solutions, Casey created a digital first solution that bypasses legacy software to bring brands and consumers closer together for an immediate ROI. Her mission is to bring shopping experiences to life and allow everyone to have a private and public life online. Casey is passionate about the future of work, old world craftsmanship, and the luxury hospitality ethos. Schedule a demo at: https://www.luxlock.com

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  • Posted on: 12/05/2019

    Will Grinches steal Christmas from America’s front porch?

    Over the past 8 years in NYC, only just recently has FedEx actually rung my bell for a delivery. Typically, packages are left outside while I was home specifically to accept a delivery. Text messages for delivery notices are becoming more common and closer to real-time, this can help consumers anticipate delivery and reduce the amount of time a package is left unattended. Locker pick-ups in Brooklyn are a huge inconvenience as the subway does not always go anywhere near the drop off location, requiring an Uber to and from. Non-branded delivery boxes is a simple initiative that can immediately cut losses by reducing the porch advertising.
  • Posted on: 12/05/2019

    The holiday season promises many unhappy returns for retailers

    Managing returns is more about managing the sale. Selling a product before it ships immediately reduces the risk of return. Customer experience software and initiatives are more important than ever to grow a sustainable and profitable business. I have seen the "exchange" option dissipate over the last 5 years; something that was a primary return control strategy in the past. Many retailers require a return and repurchase which adds 3-5 additional steps, making it easier to return and more difficult to retain the dollars spent. In-store returns this holiday season "done well" can be a traffic and revenue-driving initiative that gets people in-store for an experience and leave a lasting impression. Executed poorly, retailers could lose a customer for life.
  • Posted on: 12/03/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Kohl’s vs. Macy’s

    Macy's is the clear winner. They embraced their heritage and modernized a play on Miracle on 34th Street. Nicely done.
  • Posted on: 11/26/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Old Navy vs. T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods

    Agree. Old Navy felt more about money and obligatory gift-giving vs. a festive feeling that inspired me to want to shop for the holiday.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Amazon vs. Etsy

    The voice-over was underwhelming, but provided the education to acquire new customers.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Amazon vs. Etsy

    Agree, they both reflected the brand promise. I just think Esty has a more meaningful promise.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Amazon vs. Etsy

    A great call-out on the environmental scrutiny of late, tone-deaf.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    The RetailWire Christmas Commercial Challenge: Amazon vs. Etsy

    Amazon - buy a box. Etsy - give a memory.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    How does Backcountry.com come back from its trademark battle backlash?

    Agree. The dollars could have been spent on messaging, shopper experience, advertising spends, or local outreach programs to drive growth and performance rather than worrying about business names that aren't really a threat.
  • Posted on: 11/22/2019

    Will Americans of all colors respond to ‘Shop Black Week’?

    A week is not an impact strategy or a strong customer acquisition in my opinion, because a week will not provide a long-term return. On the other hand, I believe shopping local can have a profound impact on the community and an initiative worthy of investment. Would it make sense to gather more organizations and support for a large scale all year "shop local" initiative that does "Meet the Founder" expose's and provide the media content, awareness, and access small businesses need to grow and compete with large national chains?
  • Posted on: 11/16/2019

    Should customers just be paid for their data?

    I applaud the author.
  • Posted on: 11/16/2019

    Should customers just be paid for their data?

    It will never belong to us until we have access and control over it. It's coming, there are several retail tech startups whiteboarding and iterating. There are large companies whiteboarding and iterating. the winner will win the trust of the consumer and bring them joy; not a couple bucks. Consumers will never get rich from their data; but their lives could be enriched by it.
  • Posted on: 11/16/2019

    Should customers just be paid for their data?

    Opt in or opt out, the consumer gets nothing in return.
  • Posted on: 11/16/2019

    Should customers just be paid for their data?

    Owning our data should be a 2020 right, not an option. Companies need to look beyond the value of data as it relates to advertising channels and focus on providing consumers a real value in return for permission to use their data. "Does simply paying off customers to use their data make more sense than building a relationship that continues to add value over time?" Really well said "Wise Marketer Staff." The way companies are treating customers and abusing personal data is atrocious and paying them off is not the answer. Data needs to be leveraged to improve service, shopping experience, and product development. This is how we can improve retail performance, simply by doing a better job at work. Companies have an immense amount of data that has no way to get into the hands of the people that need it to do their job better. It's nearly impossible to execute against these data pools in real-time; except for ad strategies. I can't even call it marketing anymore. I've spent a couple years running scenarios for PII and preference management to align value structures to be mutually beneficial. It's an enormous opportunity and a problem that is going to take more than an app to solve. The solution lies in hyper-personalization that emphasizes value beyond a discount or payment. Personally, I don't want money for my data, I want value, trust, and joy. The future of retail would not be referred to as an apocalypse if companies had deep relationships with their shoppers; not just an email address or cookie used to pester them. Not one brand will ever truly know me if they don't know all of me. I firmly believe that consumer data should be aggregated, dropped into the hands of shoppers and connect it to all the b2b software through an API. Data on-demand. The experience economy offers an environment that can balance the tides and scale compounded experiences that drive LTV. Unfortunately or maybe fortunately not every brand will be part of the experience economy. The companies that embrace it will become self-sustainable and rely less on acquisition (CAC) because they can focus on customers (CRC).
  • Posted on: 11/15/2019

    Is the environment Amazon’s Achilles heel or opportunity?

    Since traditional retailers ship slower and often consolidate more than Amazon, they could just add the commentary of eco-friendly to their current shipping method at checkout at no cost.

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