PROFILE

Shelley E. Kohan

Associate Professor, Fashion Institute of Technology
Shelley E. Kohan has been serving the retail industry for over 30 years working in senior leadership positions across various functions including general management, marketing, operations, merchandising, buying, and human resources. Positions include President Shelmark Consulting, Vice President Retail Consulting RetailNext, Executive Vice President Space NK, Vice President Store Operations Saks Fifth Avenue, Operating Vice President Bloomingdale’s, Director of Logistics Macy’s West, and Regional Director Operations Macy’s West. Kohan is a recognized retail expert appearing in the NBC Nightly News, Fox News, CGTN Global Business News, Wall St. Journal, New York Times, Women’s Wear Daily, Reuters, Fortune, Chain Store Age, The Robin Report, and other publications. She is a webinar and conference speaker appearing at WWD Digital, WWD 20/20, NRF Big Show, Shop.org, Future of Stores and RIS Retail Executive Summit. Kohan has been honored as a Top Retail Influencer (2016, 2017, 2018) by Vend University. Kohan teaches as a tenured assistant professor both face-to-face and online classes on topics of retail management, case study method, marketing strategies, leadership development, and fashion business practices. Shelley earned a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree from Penn State University, a bachelor’s degree in Organizational Behavior from the University of San Francisco and an associate’s degree in Merchandising and Buying from the Fashion Institute of Technology of the State University of New York.
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  • Posted on: 10/21/2020

    Will Whole Foods draw more Prime shoppers with one-hour curbside pickup?

    Whole Foods' curbside pickup is a grand slam for the company. Prime membership continues to grow with initiatives centered around convenience. This year more than half of the U.S. population will be Prime members (over 142 million). Shoppers that love Whole Foods do not like the typically crowded in-store environments and jammed parking lots - curbside addresses both issues. Additionally, the new initiative will bring a younger customer to shop Whole Foods who are used to such conveniences. The big concerns are logistics on execution as many sites have small parking areas to manage this process and the ability to keep in stock of high demand goods.
  • Posted on: 10/15/2020

    Macy’s is turning stores dark for the holidays

    Macy's decision to create dark stores is a short-term fix for a long-term problem. Based on the need to reduce cash burn and try to recoup sales from a down-trending season, using the stores as fulfillment centers make sense for the next four months. The problem faced is making sure the right stock is in the few stores that are doing fulfillment. Macy's has been notorious for keeping goods sitting on trucks in transit and not in the right locations down to the SKU level. If Macy's can make sure there is better visibility into the supply chain and it can improve the speed to market for Q4, it could be a savior. Other retailers may follow suit if the financials support the decision. Low inventory, a need to conserve cash and significant changes in consumer demand are making this holiday especially tough for apparel and department store retailers.
  • Posted on: 09/25/2020

    Will curbside pickup be Costco’s Achilles heel?

    Target thought they would lose incremental business when they implemented curbside pickup last year (pre-pandemic), however in an earnings call, Brian Cornell stated that the frequency of visits increased significantly. While shopping in-store may lend itself to incremental purchases, the long-term value-add of providing a great service will increase the frequency of visits and build deeper loyalty with their customers. Costco will be in BIG trouble if they are not looking to add this benefit soon. The business model of the warehouse club lends itself well to curbside pick up since the model is highly operational in nature. However before they implement this process, much work needs to be done in the digital space for them to succeed (namely on its website and its app).
  • Posted on: 09/14/2020

    Lululemon is ready to tackle holiday crowd control

    If the experience is anything like what I had this past week, I would say the host at the entrance of the store is a great way to expedite the shopping visits. When I arrived, the host at the door asked if I was looking for anything particular. I told her actually I was and she told me exactly where to find it which cut down my shopping trip. Retail shoppers really want to get in and out of the stores quickly so whatever practices retailers can implement to expedite the shopping trips are winners. As a side note, Lululemon was sold out of the short I wanted but the host told me they would alter a crop pant to the length of the short for free, charge me the price of the short (which was cheaper) and send it to my house. OK, I'm hooked now - I'm a loyal customer and will go back.
  • Posted on: 09/11/2020

    Target touts diversity gains, pledges to hire more Black employees

    A continued focus on DEI for Target will allow it to gain market share with today’s consumer and be an employer of choice. A diverse team delivers richer output and keeps both customers and employees more deeply engaged.
  • Posted on: 09/01/2020

    Will the late Prime Day sabotage or catapult holiday spending?

    Let's not forget the other major event impacting holiday selling ... the US Presidential election. A change in the White House may make consumers tighten up the purse strings while no change in the white house may erupt in more social divide. Prime Day will be monstrous this year with pent up demand, so all retailers should be on notice. Too early and it may miss the holiday selling opportunity, too late and it may be a loss based on the results of the election. I would say early November would be a better bet to balance out demand and supply chain capacity. Also, most consumers over-spend on holiday versus non-holiday. October is too early. All Retailers should ABSOLUTELY join the bandwagon, as Nikki says.
  • Posted on: 06/11/2020

    Can experiential retail go live and online?

    The two main reasons that live stream shopping will take off is the shift of consumer comfort with shopping online and the overwhelming comfort that cross-generational shoppers have with using virtual applications like Zoom, Google Hangouts, FaceTime and Join.me. Other factors are convenience and trust in their favorite brands, many customers could easily get used to having their own stylist! Factors that can create high engagement online would be customer input on product development, gamification and customization.
  • Posted on: 05/07/2020

    Is curbside pickup just getting started?

    Curbside is here to stay as shoppers love the convenience and value this commerce option provides. For retailers, contrary to popular belief, providing pickup and curbside can actually increase sales and shopper frequency. On the Target investor call last month, it was stated that pickup and drive-up have increased traffic by 2.7 percent. The average spend is up 25 percent for shoppers engaging in drive-ups and in-store visits. The sales are complementary and by creating these cross-channel synergies, it can develop a deeper loyalty with the customers.
  • Posted on: 05/07/2020

    Nordstrom focuses on seamless shopping as stores reopen

    The consumer expectation has greatly shifted in a mere six weeks. The one-to-one personalized service is no longer a high expectation, even at Nordstrom. However, the Nordstrom family has always been very in-tune with the shopper's needs and is able to deliver a relevant experience based on customer expectations. At this time, Nordstrom will be able to offer a safe, comfortable shopping experience and will shift investments into more digital offerings like online, pickup, curbside and ship it which is how many consumers are wanting to shop. Maintaining extraordinary service is being redefined by the day and Nordstrom will continue to be the leader in this area.
  • Posted on: 04/30/2020

    What will retail look like if half of department stores close?

    The retail landscape will have fewer chain stores, an increase in smaller store formats, a wave of mom-and-pops and different experiences for shoppers. Over the last few decades with many mergers and acquisitions, the department stores have too many locations in duplicate markets and there is an abundance of apparel, a high category for this segment, saturating the market. This disequilibrium of supply and demand has come to head with stores closing. Some retailers will be looking for various liquidity measures to keep the business running and will close underperforming stores thereby providing sustainability to the other profitable stores. Rents will ultimately drop which will allow for a new breed of stores to emerge, many niche and unique brands. Malls will create multi-use areas as have been seen in the recent build-outs like American Dream including shopping, dining, entertainment and events. Creating community environments and some inclusive of vertical neighborhoods (like New York's Hudson Yards) will be the new normal for shopping centers.
  • Posted on: 03/30/2020

    Crocs, Walmart, Unilever and others have stepped up during the coronavirus outbreak

    Even small acts of kindness from local businesses that are able to stay open go a long way with community outreach. A small family catering business in our neighborhood continues to deliver meals to families but also donates meals to those families that are having a tough time putting food on the table. Everyone is ordering food to keep the small business going after things settle down and the people in need are benefiting. On the opposite side of the spectrum, larger companies may not know how they can help. Businesses can take the lead from H&M, where the CEO Helena Helmersson reached out to the EU to understand its needs to address the pandemic and to offer help. The company immediately started to prepare for the production of personal protective equipment for healthcare providers.
  • Posted on: 03/16/2020

    Should retail close?

    Of course non-essential stores should close up shop. It is the right thing to do for the employees and shoppers. Companies will take a hit but as long as the workforce is able to remain employed, there is a bounce-back opportunity later in the year.
  • Posted on: 03/09/2020

    Burlington Stores walks away from e-commerce

    The three factors driving the decision to leave e-commerce behind make it a smart, prudent and sensible move for Burlington. One additional reason is the cost of trying to run an off-price brand online with the inconsistent influx of merchandise. Merchandising online is a challenge but the added factor of being off-price makes this job very complex and costly. Even by 2023, 85 percent of sales will come from the stores, and while this varies greatly by category of business, e-commerce for off-price is not significant enough to positively impact the profit lines (gross margin and net profit margins). Burlington experience a more negative impact by keeping a faltering channel up and running both from a business and consumer perspective.
  • Posted on: 03/05/2020

    Study says retailers could stand a little more sunny or snowy weather

    The weather has a definite and immediate impact on retail. There are many technological applications that retailers can use to integrate with their existing systems to better anticipate weather-related issues. Weekly, monthly and seasonal weather projections can be used to help stores optimize products that are impacted by these factors at a corporate level. For example, in a pull supply chain, a faster response to unseasonable weather can minimize over-stocks and markdowns. Whereas the hourly or daily weather implications can be best addressed by the store management teams. For example, on a bright sunny day, displaying products that revolve around the sun near the front of a store or on endcaps. Weather should not be an understated consideration.
  • Posted on: 03/04/2020

    Target thinks small to succeed big time

    Target will succeed in the smaller format stores, especially with its approach of slow and measured roll-outs which allow the company to perfect the model. The brand recognition will certainly drive foot traffic into the smaller locations and with the focus on the guest, both product assortments and service will align with the shopper needs. Target is changing the shopping behavior of customers with pick-up, drive-up and same-day delivery. In the Life On Campus stores, the options include delivering to the college dorm, pre-order staple supplies and pick-up at the store. All of these benefits will resonate with college students (and parents) and will drive further digital transformation beyond the 24 percent increase over LY in digital. Fresh food offerings will be next on the list of conveniences that Target will master.

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