Aldi’s new web series is a hit

Discussion
Jul 15, 2015

Aldi, the limited assortment grocery chain, has already been named "Supermarket of the Year" in Europe. Now, the company wants to replicate its feat in the U.S. and has debuted a new web series starring Ben Bailey, host of "Cash Cab", that shows why a growing number of Americans love shopping in it stores.

The series known as "Cart Smarts with Ben Bailey" (two thumbs up from RetailWire) shows videos of Aldi customers pushing the cable television star around a store while explaining what makes them loyal shoppers of the chain. (Hint: really low prices on high quality prices backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee that allows unhappy customers to return a product for a full refund plus another item.)

"While Aldi does things a bit differently, you grow to appreciate the quirks as you get to know the Aldi way, especially when you realize how those quirks save you money. Once you’re in, you’re instantly hooked," said Mr. Bailey in a statement.

Aldi has launched the web campaign at the same time it is ramping up new store openings, particularly in Southern California where it plans to open 45 new locations next year. The move into California is part of a plan to add 650 new stores across the country over a five-year period, bringing Aldi’s total to roughly 2,000 stores in the U.S. Aldi currently operates nearly 1,400 stores in 32 states.

[Image: Cart Smarts]

"Our vision for these videos is to drive awareness and education among new customers in a memorable way," said Liz Ruggles, the chain’s director of public relations, in a statement. "Ben Bailey was the perfect choice to help us share that story with the California market. We’re hoping these videos give people a laugh and inspire them to shop at Aldi."

Aldi has made a name for itself by offering high quality private label goods at prices that undercut the grocery competition. While its merchandising philosophy is pretty much bare bones, the chain has moved into organics and other unique offerings to differentiate itself beyond price.

Aldi was ranked as the third best supermarket in the U.S. behind Trader Joe’s and Publix in a survey of more than 7,000 consumers earlier this year by Market Force information. A separate study by Consumer Reports ranked the chain as the fourteenth best supermarket in the U.S.

The chain first introduced organics in 2013 with its SimplyNature line and that part of its business has continued to grow. A study commissioned by Aldi found nearly 80 percent of adults in the U.S. would buy organic products if prices weren’t so high. Aldi boasts that its organic offerings — including fresh produce and meat as well as the chain’s private labels — are up to 50 percent lower than traditional supermarkets. The chain has also tapped into the market of consumers that are avoiding products with gluten with its liveGfree line.

To what do you attribute the growing success of Aldi? Will an improving economy help or hurt the chain’s growth prospects in the U.S.?

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Braintrust
"Price comes to mind and it is their driving force, in their ads and in their stores. They do what they do quite well and fill a niche like nobody else can. They will continue to grow and prosper with their no-frills concept regardless of the economy."

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5 Comments on "Aldi’s new web series is a hit"


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Max Goldberg
Guest
7 years 6 months ago

One result of the Great Recession is that consumers lost their affinity for brands, unless those products were significantly better than private label. Many consumers are still in an economic pinch, or don’t see much difference between brands and private label products, so Aldi is perfect. Like Trader Joe’s, Aldi offers a great selection of private label products at a great price. Aldi also limits the number of SKUs in a category, reducing consumer confusion. I’m looking forward to having Aldi in Southern California.

Tony Orlando
Guest
7 years 6 months ago

Price comes to mind and it is their driving force, in their ads and in their stores. They do what they do quite well and fill a niche like nobody else can. They will continue to grow and prosper with their no-frills concept regardless of the economy.

Heidi Hanson
Guest
Heidi Hanson
7 years 6 months ago

The article answers the first question. “Offering high quality private label goods at prices that undercut the grocery competition” has certainly contributed to enlarging Aldi’s customer base during difficult economic times, and they are keeping those customers because they are saving money without sacrificing quality.

At the same time, the stores are attracting new shoppers across the economic spectrum by moving into fresh and shelf-stable organics, gluten free foods, and healthy snack items like hummus, kefir and goat cheese.

I don’t think an improving economy will hurt the chain at all. While shoppers can get these items elsewhere, often with greater selection, the cost tends to be consistently lower at Aldi. And by making healthy choices affordable to a broader shopping base, Aldi is providing a great service to our communities.

Lee Kent
Guest
7 years 6 months ago
First off, let me just say that I am not the grocery shopper in our household, Chef Tom takes care of that! With that said, I did accompany him to Aldi just to see what it was all about. They had just opened nearby and had to ask people if they were familiar with the brand. My chef wandered about the store “price comparing” and checking out labels. He said the prices were comparable to other stores he shops, in many cases, and that he didn’t recognize many of the labels. This told me that Aldi had a long way to go. NOT! They really just had to build their identity in the neighborhood. What kind of personality were they amongst the other players? Quirky! And they have pulled it off. Now people know their labels and love them. It is kinda “funky” to shop there. What I loved the most was the Ben Bailey ad. It is the icing on the cake of what I believe Aldi has become. Fun, casual, neighborly, and yes,… Read more »
Craig Sundstrom
Guest
7 years 6 months ago

Really. low. prices. The rest is just details.

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Braintrust
"Price comes to mind and it is their driving force, in their ads and in their stores. They do what they do quite well and fill a niche like nobody else can. They will continue to grow and prosper with their no-frills concept regardless of the economy."

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