The new loyalty paradigm in the palm of our hands

Discussion
Aug 13, 2015

Clay Walton-House, Lenati’s customer retention and loyalty lead, recently published an article with Loyalty360 focused on an integrated approach to loyalty strategies. His article, "Integrated Loyalty: The New Paradigms of Ease, Simplicity, Speed," highlights the shifts that have occurred in consumer expectations leading to these new paradigms, as well as examples of companies — Amazon, Trunk Club, Starbucks and Uber — who best meet these new expectations.

Walton-House identifies three key factors impacting the new consumer dynamic: lack of time, high expectations, and technology innovation (especially when it comes to mobile). As a society, we have become accustomed to having everything we want and need at our fingertips. Thanks to our hand-held devices, we’re plugged in to information, communication, and commerce 24/7.

Having a debate with your son over whether a Brontosaurus is the same as an Apatosaurus? Just Google it. Hoping to reach your sister who lives on the other side of the world with a quick video call at 3 a.m.? FaceTime is ready to help. Want to squeeze in some shoe shopping before your morning workout? Nordstrom will take your order and ship it fast and free.

Mobile shoe shopping=

Photo: RetailWire

It goes without saying that the companies who best utilize technology to meet the ever-changing needs of the consumer will be the winners over the long haul. But consumer demand for ease, simplicity, and speed are here to stay — and those who most efficiently put this new paradigm in the palm of our hands will most definitely lead the pack.

Should integrating ease, simplicity and speed into their core product or service experience form the basis for loyalty strategies for retailers? Where is the greatest ROI? What’s the biggest challenge?

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Braintrust
"The biggest problem with most retail shopping apps today is that they add complexity and time to the shopping process instead of simplifying it. It begins with a back-end database architecture that enables a single view of a shopper or household across all customer touch points. Few have accomplished that important goal."

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6 Comments on "The new loyalty paradigm in the palm of our hands"


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Max Goldberg
Guest
7 years 5 months ago

Ease, simplicity and speed are great, but where is excellent customer service in this equation? Customer service completes the package. Ease, simplicity and speed can help generate a sale but, if something goes wrong, how will the retailer make it right?

Mark Heckman
Guest
7 years 5 months ago

The biggest problem with most retail shopping apps today is that they add complexity and time to the shopping process instead of simplifying it. It begins with a back-end database architecture that enables a single view of a shopper or household across all customer touch points. Few have accomplished that important goal.

Instead, many of our shopping apps are mere ad hoc additions to our other communication venues and for the most part there is no compelling reason to even access the app while in the store on a regular basis as it is more trouble to do so than the value it brings.

Speeding up the shopping trip, relevance of content across a holistic view of the shopper and simplicity of use will drive adaptation, usage and loyalty.

Shep Hyken
Guest
7 years 5 months ago

A long time ago I remember watching a sales presentation where the salesperson told the customer about benefits the company could offer: Great customer service, speed and price. Then he told the customer that he could choose two of the three.

I was shocked. And the proof is that today, that is what the customer expects. As for price, it doesn’t mean the lowest price — but it does mean a fair price.

So the answer to today’s question is simple. You don’t offer the customer a choice of “ease, simplicity or speed” or a “service experience.” You must offer it all!

Ralph Jacobson
Guest
7 years 5 months ago

I believe the three aspects alone are not enough to drive loyalty. There has to be a compelling offer for the shopper/consumer in order to help ensure that loyalty. Ease, simplicity and speed are not enough to get me to buy embroidery supplies, sorry. You have to compel me to use your products/services.

Al McClain
Guest
Al McClain
7 years 5 months ago

There is something to be said for simplicity. I just watched the high tech, serve yourself Coca-Cola fountain drink machine create two problems for customers in 5 minutes. The first customer held up the line for several minutes as the paradox of choice kicked in. There were simply too many choices for her to decide. The second customer successfully navigated the system, only to find that the most popular choice, Coke, was unavailable. Sometimes less really is more.

Michael Greenberg
Guest
Michael Greenberg
7 years 5 months ago

Every customer has their own reason to be loyal. The retailer’s job is to pick the reasons that resonate the most with their customer base and nail them.

Ease, simplicity and speed likely rank high on the list for virtually everyone. But there will be others—price, parking, assortment, brand selection, location, staff quality, face-to-face experience, and so on.

My personal opinion is ease, simplicity and speed have morphed from differentiators to requirements.

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Braintrust
"The biggest problem with most retail shopping apps today is that they add complexity and time to the shopping process instead of simplifying it. It begins with a back-end database architecture that enables a single view of a shopper or household across all customer touch points. Few have accomplished that important goal."

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