PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 08/03/2020

    Trader Joe’s says ‘never mind’ on private label name changes

    Reminds me of the the old saying from carpentry -- think twice, speak once.
  • Posted on: 07/29/2020

    Retailers hunt for spare change

    To say nothing of your significant other telling you to please clean off your dresser! Other guys have told me that's what happens.
  • Posted on: 07/29/2020

    Retailers hunt for spare change

    I'm with you on that Ryan. The problem is the customer won't know which price is rounded up and which down!
  • Posted on: 07/29/2020

    Retailers hunt for spare change

    Look to the North! The answer is abolish pennies and go to Loonies and Toonies. That will get things circulating and save the country multiple millions! And re: price points -- we all know those are largely imaginary. We cling to the myth that $14.97 is more appealing than $15. Let's go to RNP - round number pricing.
  • Posted on: 07/23/2020

    Best Buy connects strong sales to frontline worker performance

    I'm so frustrated by the Best Buy Geek Squad experience right now I probably shouldn't comment lest it gets worse. The only thing that has preserved my sanity while sans computer is the brilliant work of the GM at our local Best Buy. Honestly trying to work with anyone below her was impossible. So I hope the company does more than give a pay raise to employees ... a lot more training would go a long way. Finally, and you didn't hear this from me, if you're an Apple/MAC person stick with the Apple store and service. Buying a MAC from and getting it serviced by another retailer is like asking a dentist to do your heart surgery.
  • Posted on: 07/22/2020

    It is a different year. Walmart is closing on Thanksgiving.

    I hope my submission ends up next to yours Gene. It's all about "stepping up."
  • Posted on: 07/22/2020

    It is a different year. Walmart is closing on Thanksgiving.

    It IS "a tilt of the earth’s axis stuff" Jeff. This is a signal of much greater potence than just a nice gesture. Well said.
  • Posted on: 07/22/2020

    It is a different year. Walmart is closing on Thanksgiving.

    A major retailer showing true material appreciation for their employees is a good thing. Full stop. But I think this is a bigger issue than that. By far most of retail's problems are self-inflicted wounds, i.e. immediate gratification 24/7, race to the bottom, etc. In much the same way, those "entitlements" can be reversed in favor of the entitlements of retail and its employees. The secret is "Just do it!" Close on Thanksgiving or whatever. People will whine and groan and start petitions and goodness knows what. Do what Walmart is doing by giving people a lot of notice, but just do it. The whining will die down and customer will get used to it. And soon you get your retail life back. I keep thinking back to my homeland Canada and how it makes major social change. Can you imagine the USA getting a new flag, turning $1 and $2 bills into coins and eliminating pennies altogether or ... the big one, writing a new constitution? I remember Prime Minister (for 15 years) Pierre Elliott Trudeau who, in the face of public backlash about something, telling the whiners to go "fuddle-duddle." At least that's what he said he said. We don't have the nerve to tell people to wear masks so people don't die. Perhaps I've wandered from the topic ... or perhaps not. And please, this is not meant to draw reader's wrath. I happily chose this country 22 years ago. But as I think someone in this space said before, reality and retail have to become synonyms.
  • Posted on: 07/21/2020

    Can Trader Joe’s shake off its racist branding tag?

    It was Stephen M. Covey who came up with the brilliant insight that, “We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behaviour.” That seems to apply here. I have no doubt that the "intention" of Trader Joe's was totally benign regarding product names. Okay sure, perhaps in the current environment they would (and will) do something different, but there's this unavoidable implication that this has some evil intent. What amazes me is how a mere 1,500 "signatures" can cause such uproar. (If only that would work on a governmental level!) I'd like to see the ethnicity of those names. I also expect an uprising by the Society for the Integrity of the Name Joe. Apparently there are 8,975,100 potential signatories globally. Fortunately, if you look up "class" in the dictionary you'll see the Trader Joe's logo. They will do what's right and most of us will shop there forever.
  • Posted on: 07/20/2020

    Why does it take a crisis for retailers to get innovative?

    Even in this discussion the "solution" is predetermined -- i.e. the answer is digital. That is why so few have learned how to see what is actually possible. This is how most of us have been educated since kindergarten right through graduate school: fit into what is already known. This will sound strange, but we have to stop merely solving problems. Solve every problem retail has and all we'll get as a prize is "caught-up." Then we won't know what to do until we're presented with another problem. My belief is that everything that will ever be possible is already possible. We may not see it, believe it, or know how to grasp it ... but that doesn't change the reality. For the most part we have little experience in seeing possibilities. And even when we do while in the shower, in dreams or while on a run, institutional forces make sure we stay tied to what already is. All this to suggest that "innovation" is a low bar. There is so much more.
  • Posted on: 07/17/2020

    Struggling retailers lay off workers and pay millions in executive bonuses

    Hmmmm, I wonder where retail "leaders" got the idea of a double standard. Seems to me that's now an indigenous part of our culture. Sad isn't it?
  • Posted on: 07/17/2020

    Struggling retailers lay off workers and pay millions in executive bonuses

    Thanking employees for their "hard work and dedication" while giving them virtually nothing while their "leaders" continue to sit at the banquet table is the financial equivalent of politicians offering nothing but "thoughts and prayers" to folks who are suffering and dying. Sure there are "contracts" and executives can legally insist they be honored no matter the circumstances. Or they could honor their hard working and dedicated employees by sharing at least some of the bounty. To whom much is given, much is required.
  • Posted on: 06/18/2020

    The pandemic has changed retailing, maybe forever

    I don't think we quite "get it" yet. For example, we see our world as having "changed" as though it's past tense. An outside force has broken our world and we struggle with how to fix it. We long to recover, to return, to reclaim to "re-our-stores" and any other "re" word we can come up with. Come to think of it, there is no "forever" either. At least not in this realm. I hope this isn't seen merely as a play on words, but our power is in the "ing." Our universe is one mass of interdependent energy, constantly in movement. But it has lost its patience with us. To think change means we are still doomed, we have to be chang-ing. Be-ing. Think-ing. Dance-ing. To seek a "new normal" is to seek a new place to get stuck again. Let me go back and correct my first sentence. There is no "get." The enduring question is "Are we getting it?"
  • Posted on: 06/09/2020

    Loyalty marketing is at a crossroads

    A superb experience for you Bob, and a great story you'll tell audiences for a long time as you should. But as we both know far too well, for every heroic story like this there are a thousand "United broke my guitar" stories. It just seems to me that only when you have unabashed loyalty after they break your guitar should it be called true loyalty!
  • Posted on: 06/09/2020

    Loyalty marketing is at a crossroads

    This is one of the most insightful articles on the issue of "loyalty" that I've read in a long time. Thanks Phil. This is an old song from me but -- loyalty in retail doesn't exist. There is only transactional value. The question posed to us today is worded correctly with the key phrase being: "at the present moment." It's always about the present moment. A customer choice in your direction has to be earned over and over in each present moment.

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