PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 10/13/2020

    Has Walmart come up with an answer to Best Buy’s Geek Squad?

    We're both smarter now, Richard! Mine was a hardware issue too. For others in a similar situation -- instead of giving a Mac product to the Geek Squad, call AppleCare and they will send you a shipping box so you can send your computer to them. You'll get it back fixed in relatively short order. I learned that from an anonymous Geek Squad guy.
  • Posted on: 10/13/2020

    Has Walmart come up with an answer to Best Buy’s Geek Squad?

    I agree almost totally with you, Peter. My issue is that I don't think "low cost" from Walmart will ever build the bridge to "competency." With the complexity of technology these days, this equates to bargain priced brain surgery.
  • Posted on: 10/13/2020

    Has Walmart come up with an answer to Best Buy’s Geek Squad?

    It's not about the cost, it's about the competency! Apple's Genius Bar works because they are Mac experts. Best Buy is trying to handle both Macs and PCs even in their major repair centers. As a Mac guy my only advice is NEVER buy an Apple product from Best Buy nor take one to the Geek Squad for repair! I'm resisting providing a description of the absurd multi-month process of getting a Mac Book Pro fixed that Best Buy sold and had under warranty. Finally they admitted defeat and gave me a new one. The big challenge is for Walmart to create a distinct brand built more on competency than low cost.
  • Posted on: 10/09/2020

    Is Petco really a health and wellness retailer?

    Makes me wonder if you have a dog, Lee. Most of us (though we might not say so out loud) would rather be sick than have our dog sick. Weird, I know. We'd even question the meme that "dogs are not people." Our dog has kept us sane over the last six months and kept my blood pressure down at the same time. Very talented pooch. My issue on this Petco thing is that so much toxic crap is out there for our pets that it's almost impossible to decide what is healthy and what is not. The attitude seems to be - hey, it's just a dog. cat, fish, etc. So a place where everything is health-curated is just fine with me.
  • Posted on: 10/09/2020

    NYC startup promises 15-minute grocery delivery

    I totally agree with you Georganne -- but I think their position will be that the clock starts once the groceries are on the bike.
  • Posted on: 10/09/2020

    Will Dollar General win over higher-income consumers with its new store concept?

    Solid advice Jeff, though going from $1 to $5 isn't exactly jumping lanes. I agree, it really is an interesting idea.
  • Posted on: 10/09/2020

    Will Dollar General win over higher-income consumers with its new store concept?

    Dollar stores have become fun destination shopping for my family. There are none nearby so the trip is a big deal. We don't go there for anything specific, we go to see what there is to get. I hope that doesn't minimize my high standing on RetailWire! :) Going to a luxury $5 version will be even more fun - I hope they come to Scottsdale soon! Frankly, I'd like to see them side by side. I'd dress up to go to the $5 side!
  • Posted on: 10/01/2020

    Walmart reimagines its supercenters

    Like so many retailers - and even many senior living facilities themselves - Walmart seems rather oblivious to how seniors experience the store environment. Seems to me the older population is a key part of the Walmart customer demographic. According to Orfield Laboratories in Minnesota, by the time you reach 80ish you have considerably less of the perceptual and cognitive capabilities you had when you were 20. In fact it starts going down hill around 45. The retail design folks don't seem to know this. It starts with the "senior hours" being between 7:00 am and 8:00 am! Are you nuts? Older folks (and I turn 75 today - gifts regretfully declined) don't want to "reap the full advantages of the omni-shopping experience." What the heck is an omni-shopping experience, I'm looking for the Depends! If that doesn't scare them half to death, there is “end-to-end digital navigation” to guide them through their journeys. Add to that there is "a number of contactless methods to shop and pay for their purchases" so they can get them out of the store as fast as possible. How inviting! It's simply too much; older shoppers literally don't have the bandwidth to handle it, making shopping a stressful experience. Lest you think you are exempt from this reality, when's the last time you had to hand your new cell phone to your 10 year old because you couldn't figure it out?
  • Posted on: 09/28/2020

    Do consumers need beauty products delivered within an hour?

    We keep digging the hole deeper and deeper.
  • Posted on: 09/25/2020

    Will curbside pickup be Costco’s Achilles heel?

    Absolutely right, Steve. You can count on it, every Costco trip will cost you $100 and you only went there for a chicken!
  • Posted on: 09/25/2020

    Will curbside pickup be Costco’s Achilles heel?

    IMHO, here's the key point. Costco is destination shopping. People, especially over the last six months but even well before that, go there as an event, for something they enjoy doing. It is not a drive-through sensory-deprived experience. Costco -- don't change a darn thing! "Me too" is not for you!
  • Posted on: 09/24/2020

    Will homes of the future include ‘Amazon Rooms’?

    Though I end up with a different conclusion, this is well played Ryan!
  • Posted on: 09/24/2020

    Will homes of the future include ‘Amazon Rooms’?

    This idea has nothing much to do with wealth or Amazon. A delivery room wouldn't be much harder to install than a delivery door -- along the lines of a doggy door. Security can be assured by one-way hinged bars like those tire things that stop you from going the wrong way. With fast home delivery expected from all retailers this is a brilliant idea. But let's not make "Amazon" the "Kleenex" of delivery. This would be a heck of lot safer and easier than letting someone into your house with your phone. Now sure, there will be a luxury refrigerated version for perishables for those who can afford it. Why would we resent that?
  • Posted on: 09/18/2020

    Have multiple rounds of price cuts changed Whole Foods’ high price image?

    Well said Paula. I think you and Gene capture the heart of this discussion. We have a chain here in AZ called "AJ's" that makes Whole Foods look like a bargin bin. No one complains about it, that is who they are: "Purveyors of fine food." Most of us just wish we could shop there all the time. If they started discounting everything to match a nearby Safeway, they'd be gone. To your point, no one complains about the price of a Bentley either.
  • Posted on: 09/18/2020

    Have multiple rounds of price cuts changed Whole Foods’ high price image?

    "Perception" may be the most ineffective mind-changing tool ever. It is a fragile strategy equivalent to "I think..." or "I've heard..." Or even better we can use the words "allegedly giving the impression" and "noise" as George's article does. The prices match places like Sprouts or Trader Joe's or they don't, no perception needed. Hype fails the moment one decides to "try out" Whole Foods only to find bananas at 79 cents when they got them at Sprouts last week for 59 cents. Thought I'd better fact-check my banana data this morning and got this at the top of the first search page: "$1.05 for five bananas ($0.49 per pound) Bananas at Whole Foods used to be $0.79 per pound. Now, at $0.49 per pound, you can get them for about the same price as at Trader Joe's." Shopper's conclusion? Trader Joe's it is!

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