PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 02/24/2020

    IKEA tests the value of time as a sales incentive

    It must be 30 years now since my friend Donald Cooper had a very successful women's clothing store called Alive & Well, located way outside of Toronto. His pitch back then - one that pretty well everyone in Toronto could recite from his advertising - was that if you drove way out to his store and you hated it, he'd pay for your gas. As has been said, IKEA, there's nothing new under the sun. Mind you, it sure worked for Cooper! As I reminisce, he also bragged that his changing rooms had more hooks and were twice the size of anywhere else. In the children's area he served free drinks including grape juice, a beverage deliberately selected for the danger of it. Back then he was Canada's undisputed retail rebel.
  • Posted on: 02/20/2020

    Consumers hate paying for shipping more than just about anything

    The consumer's product delivery expectations is one of retail's most notable self-inflicted wounds. Is it just my scepticism kicking in or do most consumers not realize that there is no such thing as "free" shipping any more than there's a free lunch?
  • Posted on: 01/24/2020

    Can aesthetics cure our throw-away society?

    First, I'm an advocate of the principle that "Design Rules!" Appealing packaging design is, arguably, the best tool in the cause of sustainability. I also learned a long time ago that I throw few things out that have my name on them. So whether I was sending a client a proposal, report or a "motivational" coffee mug, I made sure their name was on it. I've had the joy of seeing some things still in use many years later. What if the store could print the family name or a slogan on an orange juice or ice cream container for example? The psychology behind the sustainability challenge is "What's in it for me?" Intellectually we all know that recycling is good for the planet but then recycled paper is usually more expensive than new. Unless I'm a tree-hugger (and I am) how is that a benefit for me? We have not yet figured out how to make a connection between cause and consumer.
  • Posted on: 01/20/2020

    Best Buy CEO faces alleged misconduct probe

    If any! We are a self-righteous society so prone to judge others, aren't we!
  • Posted on: 01/20/2020

    Best Buy CEO faces alleged misconduct probe

    Unknown accusers and very little information of the actual circumstances. Not a good foundation for someone to make an impactful judgement. Of course leaders, especially the most watched leaders, need to have the discipline to make wise choices. But so do those readily inclined to level accusations without the courage to stand up and take ownership of those accusations. I'm trying to decide with which proverb to end, please vote below: a.) Judge not lest you be judged. b.) Let those without sin cast the first stone.
  • Posted on: 01/08/2020

    Can casinos save the mall?

    Exactly what I was going to say Richard. But I hope this doesn't become a thing. Retail is getting more and more desperate and more and more sad as well.
  • Posted on: 01/07/2020

    Do alcohol and shopping mix?

    Agree! Trouble is now they can do both. Not exactly a brilliant retail strategy IMHO.
  • Posted on: 01/07/2020

    Do alcohol and shopping mix?

    I live near Desert Ridge too, Neil, and you describe it accurately. My problem is that any new idea where there also has to be a way to ensure that things stay civilized and do not get out of hand might not be such a good idea. Security personnel now have to define what "out of hand" actually means.
  • Posted on: 01/07/2020

    Do alcohol and shopping mix?

    So if I understand many of the other comments, the best, perhaps only, way to draw people to a shopping center is to let them drink as they walk around. Gosh this really opens up some possibilities. It may be a way to increase church attendance for example. Does no one else find this kind of a sad commentary on our society? The only way to "get people away from their computers and out into the community" is to encourage them to walk around drinking. And we're going to make it a law!
  • Posted on: 01/06/2020

    Did Domino’s gouge Time Square revelers?

    The mayor needs a dose of reality. If this was done in the middle of a hurricane, flood, ravaging fire...then he'd have a point. But it was New Year's Eve in New York City for Pete's sake! This is a city where, on the most nothing of days, a simple sandwich costs more than feeding a family of four in most other places. The added costs of overtime pay, pizza production, delivery challenges, etc. easily justifies the increased cost.
  • Posted on: 12/18/2019

    Bed Bath & Beyond’s CEO cleans house

    A lot of decisions like this happen at year-end. Unfortunately so does Christmas. What is needed is an Executive Team gifted in turnaround leadership. No argument from me. BUT...the brutal reality is that if and when the turnaround is successful, the "turn-around" team should be let go en masse as well! As Dr. Peter Robertson says in his book by the same title: "Always Change a Winning Team." Turn-around leadership styles are rarely capable of growing the organization after the turn. I'm just trying to give the company a heads-up.
  • Posted on: 11/06/2019

    Food halls drive mall traffic, not clothing sales

    Your last paragraph reflects my thinking exactly, Lisa - or maybe I'm reflecting yours in my contribution today! I differ only in that I think it's a long-term solution.
  • Posted on: 11/06/2019

    Food halls drive mall traffic, not clothing sales

    Is the whole greater than the sum of the parts? This old adage is attributed to many ranging from Aristotle to Helen Keller. But how does it apply to "the mall?" Seems to me that malls are collections of independent, non-related, non-aligned entities where the only commonality is they want your money. "Every store for itself" doesn't sound like much of a winning formula to me. This is the same problem most organizations have. They are a collection of "departments" each putting itself first and turning a blind eye to another department's struggles. But nothing in the universe actually works that way. Years ago I was able to get a client to have an annual session where every department had to endorse the goals and strategies of the other departments including any contribution they were able and willing to make to each other's success. Not only that, they had to do the same thing when it came to allocating budgets. The "greater good" was their driving force. Might a mall be designed and operated in the same way somehow? For example, how might a restaurant drive customers to a clothing store or vice versa?
  • Posted on: 11/05/2019

    Is Amazon starting to fall out of favor with American consumers?

    A truism for sure Paula: "No market is infinite." It's hard to admit and respond to that truth when we're rolling in success.
  • Posted on: 11/05/2019

    Is Amazon starting to fall out of favor with American consumers?

    While I wouldn't schedule the Amazon wake just yet, the unavoidable truth is that nothing in this universe escapes the "S" Curve lifecycle. There's birth, growth, maturity and demise. The only way to escape the inevitable is a major transformation or reinvention. The butterfly effect. Unfortunately, the decision to do so typically comes too late. When things are going well very few executives will urge people: "Let's think outside the box!" Typically that siren call means you should start looking around. Amazon is THE iconic example of retail transformation. At some point perhaps it will need to do it again. But can it? The more impactful and miraculous one's metamorphosis, the less likely another is possible. Most world-changing inventors are known for one thing - the da Vincis and Teslas of the world being the exception.

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