PROFILE

Ian Percy

President, The Ian Percy Corporation

Ian Percy is a Possibilities Expert and the founder of The Infinite Possibilities Initiative, a process for applying principles from quantum and energetic science for exponentially higher levels of innovation and profitability. An organizational psychologist, he is one of the most acclaimed business and inspirational speakers in the world. Successful Meetings magazine declared him “One of the top 21 speakers for the 21st century” and he is one of only three speakers inducted into both the US and Canadian Speaker Halls of Fame. Ian’s remarkable ability to blend depth of insight with inspiration is sought after by a wide variety of corporations and associations.

Recently he’s developed a process that engages entire cities in ‘possibility thinking’ and in understanding that they control the collective ‘energy’ that attracts or repels new residents, investments and businesses. Many organizations are stuck in 16th century Newtonian thinking, he insists, and that makes them almost irrelevant to a 21st century marketplace. For starters, he says, we need to move far beyond ‘problem solving’ to ‘seeing possibilities’. When leaders focus on the latter, problems resolve themselves and a new and prosperous reality begins to emerge. That is the secret to building a culture of innovation!

In addition Ian is a co-founder of Verdant Technologies LLC, a company that brings advanced technologies to many sectors like sustainable energy, waste management, agriculture, water science, medical devices, electric vehicles. etc.

He has authored seven highly respected books including the breakthrough book on leadership titled: Going Deep and The Profitable Power of Purpose which challenges traditional thinking about corporate vision. His latest ebook is Make Your Life a Masterpiece, a modern English translation of James Allen’s 1902 classic As a Man Thinketh.

Ian has both Canadian and US citizenships and lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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  • Posted on: 07/27/2022

    Grocers and food brands take older consumers for granted

    Good thoughts there Gary. FYI ... In media marketing including television, only 10 percent of marketing spend is aimed at the senior demographic. Rumour is that half of that is for Depends. :)
  • Posted on: 07/27/2022

    Grocers and food brands take older consumers for granted

    Sister, I gave you an "Amen" in my submission.
  • Posted on: 07/27/2022

    Grocers and food brands take older consumers for granted

    EVERY business is missing the mark with the senior consumer. Since I "are" one, I'm seeing this with almost every shopping experience. Frankly we need to adjust the "50+" idea. 50 years old is barely middle-age. Where retail is really ignorant or dismissive is with those 70+. To define the demographic a little more, those over 70 control almost 30 percent of household wealth -- mistreating a third of the money is not a good strategy! As we age, our ability to handle complexity diminishes. You'll notice that after 65 or so. When there is too much complexity the result is stress, withdrawal and no decision-making (aka no buying something.) Even senior living facilities don't get this reality which is why your mother tends to sit in her room watching TV. She's avoiding stress. At 77 (yes RW needs a new picture) I got a new car last week. On a good day I'm pretty good with it. Still writing books, launching new ventures etc. But when I was faced with over 600 pages of owner instructions bound into three volumes I regretted the purchase. The 20 something sales person took five minutes to help link my phone and everything else "is in the manual." Retail needs "senior" training!
  • Posted on: 05/26/2022

    Is now the perfect time for grocers to sell imperfect food?

    Could not be said better Dave! The problem is imperfect marketing not imperfect produce.
  • Posted on: 05/26/2022

    Is now the perfect time for grocers to sell imperfect food?

    Let's be honest -- when it comes to nature's produce, what we declare "imperfect" is nothing more than a mindset, a judgement with no basis, influenced by marketing. If I could get an oddly shaped avocado or mango less expensively, I'd jump at it. Dave Bruno's comments on perception are fully on point. And heck, aren't we all "imperfect" in some way? Broken boxes etc. are a totally different category. Might parts be missing? Was this a returned product for some reason? At least there is some basis for that judgment. My suggestion is that grocery stores make uniquely shaped produce a feature. Show it some love. Market it boldly and creatively. Give it its own section. Make the "imperfect" beautiful. It's what inside that counts isn't it?
  • Posted on: 02/25/2022

    Will emotional storytelling work for The Container Store?

    I see what you did there....
  • Posted on: 02/25/2022

    Will emotional storytelling work for The Container Store?

    Could not be said better, DeAnn. But the connection is not with the container, it's with our precious stuff. The story has to be about our stuff. If The Container Store finds how to tap into that reality, this rebranding has a chance.
  • Posted on: 02/25/2022

    Will emotional storytelling work for The Container Store?

    Forty-four years is well past the "best before" date so this initiative is to be applauded. "Show us your drawers" is brilliant, funny and engaging. And emotional stories are always effective if relevant and done well. An emotional connection is usually based on something one can relate to emotionally. That doesn't mean it requires a pulse, but it does need heart. A '57 Chev Belaire is just a physical/mechanical/commodity thing -- but, oh my, not to me. I have a hard time thinking of how one would connect emotionally to anything in The Container Store in the same way. I don't know anyone who wistfully tells me about how they organized their drawers. Did I ever tell you about the time I saw my first '57... They have good (though IMO expensive) stuff, but that's what it is - stuff.
  • Posted on: 02/08/2022

    Past purchases are no indication of current or future brand loyalty

    You are so so right Katie! Brilliant comment.
  • Posted on: 02/08/2022

    Past purchases are no indication of current or future brand loyalty

    I'm with Katie's comment that "loyalty" is totally the wrong word. It seems that retail can be a little too needy, longing for relationships. But it's looking for love in all the wrong places. A purchase is not a sign of a relationship. We have enduring relationships with people, not with things. I am loyal to the woman who cuts my hair and if she went to another chain, I'd go with her. If sales people would recognize that how they personally serve and relate to customers is what generates actual loyalty and not the stuff on the shelves -- it'd be a game-changer.
  • Posted on: 01/28/2022

    Walmart shoppers find time is well spent in new incubator store

    Seems like forever I've been critical of retail's goal of getting the customer out of the store as fast as possible. Walmart must read RW! The intent of making the store interesting can't help but be a winning strategy. And, yes, it may take a while to figure out how to do that effectively, but it is a worthy endeavor. "Simple Fascination" is the secret. Making it too complicated and technical will be the idea killer. FWIW ... I feel the same way about the idea that everything has to be on one page or executives won't read it. The sad assumption is our brains can't handle anything more than that. The "one-page-strategy" only works if the writing is boring. We are innately creative beings which formal education has pretty well destroyed. Make things interesting and we awaken the customers we need!
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    Feel your pain, Zel. "Bumpers" aren't bumpers anymore, they are radar systems.
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    As a currently horse-less horse guy, Kevin, I desperately miss those horses!
  • Posted on: 01/21/2022

    Will airbags calm fears about driverless vehicles?

    A 500-pound+ vehicle that can travel up to 25 miles an hour has an air mattress front and back that will "soften the impact" when it hits someone or something. How reassuring. Air bags can save your life, but they're going to hurt. A friend had a less than 5 mph accident bumping into a car that stopped suddenly in front of him. Cost of repair to one vehicle was about $5,000 by the time all the technology in the "bumper" was replaced and recalibrated. Why didn't the auto-stop tech work? Because I (oops, "he") wasn't going fast enough. I don't think this is ready for prime time yet.
  • Posted on: 12/20/2021

    What happens when D2C brands diversify product lines?

    Your caveat is the key, Jeff. Is there alignment or coherency with the starting point? I'm not so sure that many brands build on a working awareness of just what the "brand promise" is.

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