Are home improvement shows changing the purchasing path to reno projects?

Discussion
Source: HGTV
Oct 27, 2022

A university study finds homeowners are increasingly influenced by home improvement media, leading to continuing anxiety about whether their homes are measuring up to standards.

“Historically, home is understood as a place for you and your family that represents who you are,” said Annetta Grant, Bucknell University Freeman College of Management professor, in a press release. “The home improvement media is shifting that to an understanding of the home as your biggest asset that must meet some marketplace standards.”

The popularity of industrial-grade appliances, large kitchen islands with bar stools, open floor plans, neutral color schemes and spa-like bathrooms is attributable to homeowners trying to live up to “the modern tastemakers of home design” featured on home improvement TV shows, magazines and blogs, the study concluded.

“Uniqueness is shunned while professional expertise and market standards are celebrated,” said Ms. Grant.

In many cases, homeowners partake in continual renovation projects, seemingly never satisfied with the upgrades. The researchers concluded that firms can help consumers experiment more in refurbishments by creating platforms that celebrate uniqueness.

Houzz & Home’s eleventh annual homeowners survey found home renovation activity and spend reaching a four-year high. Said Marine Sargsyan, Houzz staff economist, in a statement, “Market fundamentals, including limited and aging housing stock, continue to propel the home renovation market.”

A survey from FrogTape that came out in February found that when it comes to design inspiration, homeowners are most likely to turn to home renovation magazines (59 percent) or blogs/websites (49 percent). Sixty-nine percent agreed being indoors during the pandemic had inspired them to renovate their homes.

The “9th Annual LightStream Home Improvement Trends Survey,” released in March, found some renovation project planners seeking emotional fulfillment, not just a return on investment. Only one in three (34 percent) homeowners felt joyful in their home and nearly one in three (29 percent) cited being “happy with a space for years to come” as an important reason why they would invest in a 2022 renovation project.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: How has the popularity of home improvement television, magazines and blogs influenced home renovation projects? Should home improvement retailers emphasize return on their housing investments over creating customized dream homes?

Please practice The RetailWire Golden Rule when submitting your comments.
Braintrust
"The popularity of home improvement endures and smart retailers should highlight their offerings appropriately, whether it is making a dream home or renovating for resale."
"Absolutely, home renovation content inspires us to invest in our nest."
"I would encourage big box home centers to appeal to women, and create new functionality on their apps to help customers find what they’re looking for."

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7 Comments on "Are home improvement shows changing the purchasing path to reno projects?"


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Neil Saunders
BrainTrust

Houses are for living in, they are not just there to provide a ‘return on investment’. As such, it is hardly surprising that people want to upgrade their homes with modern designs and renovations. I don’t see this as anything new. Tastes change and so, of course, renovation and refurbishment is a continuous process. As for home improvement shows, these are not new either: my personal favorite – This Old House – has been going since before I was born! I would actually say that for younger generations, social media like TikTok is a growing influencing factor as it features lots of interiors on posts about cooking, renovation, and so forth.

Michael La Kier
BrainTrust

Home improvement content creates aspiration and inspiration that retailers must tap into. The popularity of home improvement continues to endure and smart retailers should highlight their offerings appropriately, whether it is making a dream home or renovating for resale.

Georganne Bender
BrainTrust

How has the popularity of home improvement mania influenced home renovation projects? Big time. HGTV is my go-to channel; it’s fun to dream big but too exhausting to think about actually doing anything. I get enough of remodeling in my job, but I still tune in because you never know.

My neighbors are the exact opposite. There isn’t a house on our street that hasn’t gone through some kind of upgrade during the COVID-19 shutdown, and it still continues today. Each of the home improvement TV shows emphasizes remodeling as an investment; retailers would be well advised to do the same.

Lisa Goller
BrainTrust

Absolutely, home renovation content inspires us to invest in our nest. The pandemic transformed our homes into multifunctional spaces. Home improvement media inspires by showing us what’s possible: Zoom-worthy beauty, comfort and function.

Retailers can focus on a return on housing investment for the masses and creating custom dream homes for the few. While spending is down, many of us still prioritize home improvement, even in a recession.

Cathy Hotka
BrainTrust

HGTV is the ultimate in escapism. I would encourage big box home centers to appeal to women, and create new functionality on their apps to help customers find what they’re looking for.

David Spear
BrainTrust

Home renovation has always been seen as a means to invest in one’s living space for appeal, for comfort, for confidence, and for return on value. TV shows, podcasts, YouTube and other social media have definitely driven consumers to act, especially, during the pandemic, where consumers were forced to re-imagine their homes with office space in mind. Retailers would be well advised to include home transformation with new form and function possibilities.

Dave Bruno
BrainTrust

Home improvement television has completely transformed the industry. Think about kitchen cabinet trends. Three years ago, every designer on HGTV was installing white shaker cabinets. Now, everyone is mixing bold colors and white oak cabinets. And people who installed white cabinets five years ago now see those shows and fear their kitchens look dated. The “trend timeline” has compressed from 10-15 years into 3-5 years. Those of a certain age will remember when avocado-colored appliances were all the rage. That trend lasted for the better part of a decade, if not longer. Now, everything from cabinet color to countertop materials to finishes (brass is back!?) drives people to renovate more frequently. Retailers should (continue to) focus on FOMO – fear of missing out on the latest trends and having your home appear dated – to drive more projects. ROI is a distant concept versus the instant emotional response to FOMO.

wpDiscuz
Braintrust
"The popularity of home improvement endures and smart retailers should highlight their offerings appropriately, whether it is making a dream home or renovating for resale."
"Absolutely, home renovation content inspires us to invest in our nest."
"I would encourage big box home centers to appeal to women, and create new functionality on their apps to help customers find what they’re looking for."

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